Dealing with Arguers

“Make every effort to live in peace with everyone and to be holy”

Hebrews 12:14, TNIV

 

For me personally, someone in my face can be nasty and irritating.  It seems I can never say enough.  I simply don’t get any sense of having “convinced” them of my position or views.  I maintain composure (I try, anyway) and then ignite when its all over.

Inevitably, I start playing the whole ugly argument over and over.  Often, if I feel quite vulnerable, I will enlist my dear wife’s availability.  She comes to my side, where I find the support I wanted.

Intense arguments can derail me from so much.  Going to scripture in this frame of mind does me no good at all.  When I’m in this place, prayer becomes unplugged (kind of like my exercise “treadmill.”)  I sit in my chair and simmer, and occasionally boil over.

What do I need most?

  • Humility
  • Gentleness, and sensitivity
  • Kindness  
  • Pre-planning, or pre-alignment of my heart
  • A sense of humor
  • Renunciation of my “rights” and privileges

 

A lot of things could be added to my quick list, that would be helpful.  Making cookies, or doing new chores also sort out things.  If the issue is more mountain than molehill, find your way to an elder or a pastor.  But whatever you do, it’s best to keep moving.  So much is working to solidify you in one place.  It’s like walking through wet cement! (It’s best not to linger too long, in one place.)

Know this though.  Being in an argument or conflict is not sin.  They may disturb us, but we don’t necessarily have to sin.  Jesus had some whoppers in His day.  He walked into these conflagrations without a diminishing of peace or joy.  He walked out of them the same way.  He can teach us, by showing us how He did it.

Just one more thing (I’m trying hard to write a essay here.)  You don’t hear or read it very often–but, we all are models and examples to someone else.  Our children, neighbors, friends, the bank teller and our gym instructor.  Not that everyone knows of our issue, our frustration.  But that our lives are filled with a “joyous humility.”  I think what hurts me most is that I fear my witness or testimony has been damaged by my words and actions.

God is God of my everything.  He knows what happened.  He knows me, and knows them.  The sin does not impede His vision of you.  When he was on earth, he was never disturbed by any confict.  Today, he is the same.  Disputing with someone else– no problem.  He doesn’t get loose and cut you down in embarassment.  Brilliantly and lovingly, He absorbs all that concerns you.  He is more gentle than you know and kinder than any man, or woman. 

About Bryan Lowe

A repentant rascal with definite issues, but who is seeking to be authentic in his faith to Jesus Christ. An avid reader and a hopeful writer. Husband and father. A pastor and Bible teacher. A HCV and brain tumor survivor. Diagnosed with clinical depression, epilepsy and now disabled. Enjoys life, such as it is, in Alaska.
This entry was posted in advice, believer, brokenness, devotional, discipleship, forgiveness, friendship, frustration, humility, humor, Jesus Christ, kindness, personal comments, Serving Mentally Ill Christians, spiritual lessons, trials, understanding and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Dealing with Arguers

  1. blesseddad says:

    Greetings Bryan,
    I was steered to you by Linda K., as that is where I found your link. I read “about you” and the last two posts, and I like what you have to say. God bless you as you minister to all of us mentally ill Christians, it’s a tough job, but somebodys got to do it. ;-) Look forward to readng much more of you in the fuyure. God Bless
    Jim

  2. Mary says:

    So timely, at the end of my day yesterday I was in a heated discusion and the other person clammed up in frustration and walked away angry. I was asking God, did I sin, was i in sin? How could i have spoken differently? Should I have even spoken at all?! Was I a bad example? So often when I stand my ground and others get angry and frustrated I feel guilty because it wasn’t settled peacefully. Then I was comforted by the thought that God knows the whole matter, both sides. You’ve pretty much described the whole scenario here and given me tools and comfort to keep moving forward where I usually stay stuck too long. Thank you.

  3. Debbie says:

    I really liked your list and advice to keep moving. The concrete image is going to stick with me!

Comments are closed.